General Notes on the Aesthetics of Goon Architectural Style and Homes

The domicile of the average Gjeunse (both family and individual), while always unique, does tend to approach a general conformity in aesthetic preference.

They live in small, free-standing structures that can economically accommodate about six. Their homes and frequently businesses too, are composed of a sort of moss that can be stripped in large patches and which cakes and adheres with wet air while drying and solidifying with dry air.  It is both insulating and creates excess oxygen inside the structure. The primary drawback is the constant need to re-apply which doesn’t seem to bother Gjeunse at all. In fact, it is common Gjeunse to take what we might call a “personal day” simply to re-apply moss to their places of employment.

Their homes are cramped, cozy spaces. Overwhelmed with books and teeming with objects d’art, with room functions roughly similar to ours. The main difference is the presence of a spa room — separate from the bathroom — in every home. These function as dens or great rooms and Gjeunse will often host parties in their spa areas. It’s curious and delightful as literature is such a huge part of their culture and yet, in the spa room, it is considered taboo to bring books. All references must be made by recitation.

Perhaps more later,
Aamer

Vexed Cthulhu, the 13th Zodiac

 

Once a mighty monster, ensnared and imprisoned by mythology.

A former master of the art form,  Cthulhu — vexed — now finds himself caged within the prism. A fallen child of the Ancient Ones, left neither to prosper nor to suffer on a godforsaken planet located lifetimes and galaxies away from his nexus of birth. Cthulhu’s heritage was that of builders. Great, towering structures that adhered to a singular language of geometry. The properties of this geometry defied the ordered rules of the universe. No one could look upon these structures without a deepened sense of fear, awe, and profound disorientation. In short, it was the architecture of distortion.

There are many uses for the architecture of distortion, especially as a space and time traveling entity like Cthulhu. But to him and the others of his breeding it was an art used to construct vast cities, to explore the far reaches of the universe, to defy limitations of the self.

And then this art form came to the hands of another species occupying times and spaces known to the Ancient Ones: that of Man, who noted the architecture of distortion, measured its aspects, and put its powerful advantages to hateful purpose against his own kind, against his own gods and even against his own reason.

And now Cthulhu –vexed — lounges caged within the prism, feared by none, forgotten by all… except for the occasional exultation of certain junior literati.